#2 Content Overview – What is Content Overview?

Content overview is an SEO tactic that helps rank a page higher on search engine results pages. It is created to talk about the page’s content and give readers an idea of what they should expect when they click through to the article. To understand how this is done, imagine that you are browsing the internet looking for a cupcake recipe. At the bottom of the page, Google may have a piece of text saying ‘Click here if you’re interested in learning more about making cupcakes.’ You may click the link, go to the page, and find out that this is a cupcake recipe. However, you may navigate away from the site not understanding what you will be doing.
This is where content overview comes in. It does not tell readers exactly how to make cupcakes, but it guides them towards learning more about what they may be interested in. When a reader clicks through to an article, they will be able to read more about it without leaving the page they are on. This is helpful for converting readers from others.
In essence, content overview gives readers more information about the article they are clicking through to and tells them what it will contain and what questions it may answer. This is useful for ranking a page higher on search engine results pages (SERPs) as it increases the chances of a reader clicking through from the first result, in turn increasing exposure of the page. To increase visibility of the page on SERPs, content overview gives readers an idea of what they will find and guides them towards a conversion.
When creating the content overview, the author must understand what readers will find on the page it covers. The overview can be as detailed or as general as wanted, with descriptions of different areas of content. A variety of topics could be discussed in this section, such as the subject matter of a piece and its goals.

i don t want a cupcake
i don t want a cupcake

Your Little Black Book of Secrets to Building an E-Business

Content overview gives a brief introduction of what content is found on the page. It can be in the form of an introduction, brief description and conclusion of the article. The goal of this is to help users understand and navigate easily through a site. This helps a reader determine if they should keep moving forward with reading your content, or if they should look for a better content elsewhere.
“Knowledge is a valuable resource, and sharing information with others allows us to receive something in return. It’s important that this intersection between knowledge and generosity is fostered and promoted.” – David Kadavy
The purpose of this article: “The purpose of this article is to give an overview of the material contained in the document.”. This attribute helps users make an informed decision whether they should click on it or not. It is important to remember that the purpose of your page or article should be the same as the content of your page or article. This is significant because if you are trying to promote something, say an eBook, there should be some mention of it on your content.

i don t want a cupcake
i don t want a cupcake

Why Google and Facebook have gone from Big Content Marketing Giants to Social Media Perpetual Minions

Google and Facebook are the two largest sources of information for most people. While Google is dedicated to helping users find relevant content and Facebook is dedicated to finding relevant things for you to like, share and/or comment on, both of these giants are looking for quick solutions to keep their users happy. This means that they will take whatever they can get when it comes to content. That’s not to say that they are not selective, but when it comes to fresh content for your website, the bigger and more obscure the better. While the big websites who have been in business for years will have a leg up on you, there is no reason why you can’t get some attention from them.
Google Likes Big Content

i don t want a cupcake
i don t want a cupcake

A Brief History of How I Became a Serial Blogger and My $200 Million Billion Dollar Career

A brief history of how I became a serial blogger, and my $200 billion dollar career.I first started out as a blogger when I was 13, writing on AOL’s website. I got paid to write about anything that related to AOL, and was able to make thousands of dollars a year in cash. However, the internet changed dramatically in the early 2000s, and AOL was not able to keep up with it. They began to close down their internet department, and when they were gone all of the content they had paid anyone to post was gone. I was the only person to advertize on their website after AOL closed their internet department down, and I was left with a lot of free time. As a result, I began posting content on myspace and myspace blogs.
I continued to post content on myspace, blogs and websites for over four years without being paid for it. In 2006, I met Anthony Trantino , who suggested that I blog about what I had done for him over the previous four years without pay or credit. One of the first posts was about the AOL website and my content and how it disappeared when AOL closed their internet department.

i don t want a cupcake
i don t want a cupcake

Professional SEO & Social Media Management Blogging Success Story Part 1 – Getting Started & Stayin’ Alive! Part 2 – Year 2 & 3 & 4 – Total Failure!

Professionals who blog about SEO, social media, and other subjects have a lot of basic advice to give. That’s why I’m going to share my Professional SEO and Social Media Management Blogging Success Story Part 1: Getting Started & Staying Alive! Part 2: Year 2 & 3 & 4 – Total Failure! to help other content marketers stay on life support.
I started blogging professionally about SEO and social media management in September of 2012. I’d been writing these topics on my personal blog for over a year, so I was pretty experienced when I decided to start a blog as my full-time job.
I had blogged on my own for over a year before I started doing SEO & Social Media blog consulting in the remote areas of the Internet. I even used a blog as my resume to get hired on at a company where blogging was not an official position that required formal training or certification.
The professional blog was, for me, a way to do paid blogging on a 1:1 basis outside of what I already did for free in my personal blog. At first it was practice and getting used to being paid. That was my job description: “get paid for blogging”.
I had no idea what to blog about, so I blogged on everything I could think of. The result was a stream of posts that are now completely worthless. What I write today is completely different than the work I wrote 2 years ago, and it’s not just because I’ve learned SEO & Social Media Management while blogging.

i don t want a cupcake
i don t want a cupcake