Introduction: How do Whales communicate?

Scientists may have the answers, though. We do know that the sounds whales make are unique, unlike anything else in the animal kingdom. And we’ve learned that whales can be trained to save their lives by identifying specific noises and repeating them after a human trainer has given them specific hand gestures. This phenomenon is known as echolocation, and it’s how dolphins and many other whales make decisions about where they’re going to swim next.
So, how do whales echolocate? Research suggests that whales produce two types of sounds — a low-frequency ‘buzz’ and a higher-pitched ‘click.’ “The buzzes are most often used to detect food,” says marine biologist John Ford. “Click sounds indicate that the whale is aware of something in its environment.”
In recent years, researchers have discovered that many different kinds of whales use their unique calls to communicate with each other and with humans. [1] Whales use their calls to communicate with each other during social interactions, and they use human-made sounds to communicate with us.
So, what do these sounds tell us about whales and how they communicate? For example, researchers have noted that many kinds of whales have a tendency to learn new sounds very quickly. In one case, researchers used a modified telephone to ask dolphins questions in the waters off Hawaii. They would call “Hello,” at the exact moment that a scientist would blow a whistle underwater. Almost immediately, the dolphins would respond with a whistle.
The whistle they used was the same one that had been used by the scientist underwater — even though they’d never heard it before! These dolphins had learned to understand our language in just one call.

the sunday whos making all those
the sunday whos making all those

What the Sounds a Whale Makes Tell Us About its Temperament

Though the sounds a whale makes can vary widely, they tend to be kinds of high-pitched squeaks that come in short bursts. These sounds have an odd cadence to them, and are often partially rhythmic. Yet there’s no reason that these noises couldn’t be produced by just about anything with a mouth, including humans. That’s because whales are not limited to one specific kind of shape for their mouths or throats. They may have a very long throat, with a huge set of teeth at the front. Or they may have a small mouth, with teeth that are nothing like ours. And many whales don’t even have teeth at all. So we shouldn’t be too surprised if one day we learn that whales make noises that sound just like birds, or cats, or something else entirely.
But what is actually being produced by the whale itself isn’t even close to the most interesting thing about the sounds they make. The whale makes a noise by vibrating its throat, larynx, or other parts of its body. These parts move in and out, creating the sounds we hear. But some of those sounds we don’t hear are almost surely there too.

the sunday whos making all those
the sunday whos making all those

5 Ways a Whale Uses Scent to Communicate with It’s Fellow Divers

None of the sounds a whale makes are very pleasant to listen to. But some are definitely more pleasant than others. The communication sounds that have the most pleasant sound quality are often also the kinds of noises we usually consider to be ‘songs.’ For example, humpback whales from Hawaii make clicking sounds with their cheek pouches that sound kind of like “clack, clack.” And a great many of the saudi Arabian humpback whales make the same kind of sound. We don’t really know why these whales only stick to one sort of noise, in other words, but we know that they do. And we also know that many of these whales stick to a pretty limited range of noises. That’s because a lot of whale songs are designed with two purposes: to get the attention of another diver, and then once the attention is paid, that diver will supply the opening bars of a song back to that whale.
Whale songs are often designed so the ‘singing’ mammal can tell an entire dialogue between two whales, who both speak the same language in a highly evolved way. There are many different kinds of vocalizations that whales can make. Some are loud and rhythmic, like the sort of sounds made with clicks, while some tend to be quieter and less rhythmic, but still potentially useful for keeping track or communicating with other whales. Still others are used as alarms, or even warnings. A whale’s language can be incredibly complex and sophisticated, and these are the types of noises that most humans seem to enjoy listening to. They’re also the noises that we seem to be able to translate pretty easily, too.
How do We Know What a Whale is Saying

the sunday whos making all those
the sunday whos making all those

How Do Whales Sleep? What do Scientists Know about how they Breathe?

Until then, we’ll have to be content with observing whales at a distance. We do know that some of them seem to have light-emitting organs above their eyes that function as lenses in much the same way our own lenses do. That’s probably why whales can see so well underwater. But it’s still not clear whether whales actually sleep like humans do, or if they just lie still between periods of activity. And though it’s often said that whales must sleep with one eye open — a necessity because they sometimes feed at the surface while swimming — they’re actually capable of sleeping with both eyes closed. But no one has directly observed such behavior in any whale yet, so we have no real proof.
Eventually, perhaps, we’ll acquire that proof. But for now, we must be content with the knowledge of just how extraordinary it is to have any knowledge at all about these magnificent animals.

the sunday whos making all those
the sunday whos making all those

Conclusion – The Secret Life of Whales is Still the Most Unanswered Question in Science

Just as the top secret life of airplanes is still the most unanswerable question in science, we ponder how these whales communicate with each other. We wonder how they communicate with humans, and whether they even do. We’re quite sure that they don’t use any of the known senses, and we think that their hearing is different than ours is. Yet we also know that their hearing isn’t all that sensitive to sound. So we can’t say for sure whether their hearing is very different from ours, or not. We’re not even sure how much of a role hearing plays in whale communication. We know of no evidence that whales use echolocation, either. We do know that some species of whale mimic the sound of prey animals that are the most dangerous for them to eat. And we’ve known for a long time that whales tend to sing when they’re happy and in good spirits, and are likely using a form of echolocation in their singing to help them find food. (For more information on whale communication, read The Secret Life of Whales is Still the Most Unanswered Question in Science on page 35. Or visit http://www.whale.to/discover/communication.html.)
Whales communicate with each other by using sounds, too. They not only use the sounds to search for food or other whales, but they also use them in a way that we think of as music. Like the birds they are sometimes compared to, they sing, and they can even play music together. And they have a strange way of singing that is almost like they’re secretly talking to each other.

the sunday whos making all those
the sunday whos making all those